The Natural Garden Coach

Tuesday, April 7, 2009

My "Little" Climber



Here are a couple of pics of my Madame Alfred Carriere climbing rose. Other than the Marie Pavie rose, which blooms almost all year long, this is the first of the spring blooming roses. The first photo is a close up with the second being a longer shot. There you can see the "Carnaby" clematis (I think; see my last posting) and some white irises about to bloom. (And to the right is a boxwood, unknown variety, and another rose about to bloom, again an unknown variety.)



Madame Alfred Carriere, a Noisette rose, was developed sometime in the 1800's. It has a lovely Tea rose fragrance and was the first rose planted at Sissinghurst garden by Vita Sackville-West. The plant has only been here for two growing seasons, although it was a gift from a friend's too shady garden, so maybe it is three years old. It grew very rapidly and as you can see, it's really a bit tall for the trellis and the house. It's going to require some pruning and training after its initial bloom this year so that it's more clear of the windows. Although it gets blackspot every so often, I think that's because of its location in a corner. Other than that it's extremely hardy and I would highly recommend it for a more open space!

14 comments:

  1. Hi Jean, wow, the Madame is massive! This is one of the replacement roses I planted last year to grow on the new arbor my son built. Jackmanii clemmie was put in the hole with it. If it grows to look like this, I will be whistling Dixie! :-)
    Frances

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  2. Beautiful, if that's your little climber what in the world does a big climber look like! Awesome.

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  3. Nice pictures of MAC, Jean. This is indeed one of the best roses possible for the South. Vigorous, disease resistant, fragrant, low maintenance. Just beware that it gets pretty big pretty fast!

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  4. Looks great! I have one which is similar (New Dawn), but given the differences in climate/latitude between your rose and mine, it will be some time before I have a picture to rival yours!

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  5. Frances - whistling Dixie, ha! :-) I have no doubt your Madame will do well.

    Darla - I do have a nice 'little' climber, one I just planted. It's a miniature rose called Red Cascade. I can't wait to see how it does.

    Davy - Yes, I love the fragrance. I'm afraid mine's already gotten too big for its area!

    Ruth - I've always wanted to try growing New Dawn. And to me, roses grow so well in England. But maybe you're a bit farther north and it's more difficult there.

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  6. An arbor with beautiful roses and clematis! What a delightful sight! I planted a Red Cascade which is a little miniature climber (or sprawler) but, Madame is a beauty! gail

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  7. Jean, I just posted on my blog about this rose which is the first to bloom for me (well, except for Lady Banks). It is one of my favorites.

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  8. Jean
    New Dawn is lovely and grows quite well for me. Roses are a little more difficult here than in the south due to the humidity and higher rain levels here - we get the weather from the atlantic. Fungal diseases are the problem, I have an orange rust which is on a lot of trees round here. This year I'm going to try a victorian remedy and dust coal soot from my chimney onto the soil, will see how it goes!

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  9. Such a romantic sight. I'd love to have a rose climbing about.
    Brenda

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  10. Oh, isn't she beautiful!! She got very bloomy very quickly!

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  11. Beautiful! The first of my roses are blooming in Magnolia, too, but not nearly so profusely. I am so happy it is now truly spring!

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  12. Love your rose and all your fabulous pictures. Am just getting started on my own blog and checking out others to learn what's happening at other blogs. Pinkie
    www.greengardenersnews.com.

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