Monday, February 9, 2009

Frugality in my Garden

Whew, what a busy weekend in the garden! Nothing like some balmy temperatures to get me going. I did a lot of trimming up of freeze damaged plants, pruned the clematis (I should blog about that sometime; that task is said to strike terror in the hearts of even seasoned gardeners!), planted out some more sweet peas, and started working on my succulent stock tank planter. But perhaps most importantly, I potted up some baby plants. This is my new era of frugal gardening. Used to be when I had extra plants lying about I would attempt to give them away. Usually I was not very successful at that because I don't know that many folks who garden. So ultimately they succumbed to the compost pile (at least I'm recycling!). But not this year. In my new role as Ms. Uber Frugal Gardener (anyone remember the Frugal Gourmet?), I vow to waste not.


Therefore, extra plants or plantlets will get potted up for possible future use. Here you can see five little coreopsis plantlets (unknown variety). The plant puts out these little guys with the lucky ones rooting. But sometimes they're popped into the air instead, I guess with the hopes that some day they'll make it down to the ground. So some of my little plantlets have roots, some do not. Time will tell which are successful. Included here is a shot of the coreopsis in bloom last year, with "Victoria Blue" salvia in the background.


I was going to post some more pics of various little plants I've potted up but I'm having network issues, dang it. So instead I'll post one more photo, this one of a tree farm. Although I'm trying to be frugal in these tough times, I'm also trying to be optimistic about the future. Therefore, I'm going to spend some money and buy and plant an oak tree. This tree farm is a scant two miles from my house. Those white pots are rather interesting. They're actually bags that are said to prevent roots from wrapping around the inside, like they sometimes or often do with traditional black pots. Instead, when they hit the side of the bag they naturally prune themselves. Something about the air.


I'm thinking that if I give my oak tree enough of a stimulus package, say a nice mulch of compost and some consistent water, it'll repay me in years to come. :-)

8 comments:

  1. Διαβάστε τον ΡΟΔΟΣυλλέκτη.
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  2. You've been busy! This was an excellent weekend for garden work.

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  3. Thanks for the inspiration - I was just looking at my clematis this afternoon and thinking I should do something about it, then caught sight of the bushes and snowdrops about to flower, so lots to do now!

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  4. Hi Jean, good for you. They say planting a tree, and especially an oak is planting for the future. Interesting about the roots not going around in the white plastic, maybe because it is white? You coreopsis and salvia photo is so lovely, it puts a new light on those babies. Mass planting anyone?
    Frances

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  5. Frances, the trees are in white bags which are kind of porous. So I think when the roots hit the air, they self-prune. Hmm, mass planting but where?? :-)

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  6. Jean,
    Interesting about the white bags and the self-pruning theory...that's a new one to me. After you buy one and plant it please update us on how the roots actually looked.

    Happy Valentine's Day.

    Jon at Mississippi Garden

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  7. I remember the Frugal Gourmet. It was my first exposure to what food was really about. It was on when I went home from school for lunch I would eat a baloney sandwich and watch. I have an inordinate desire to plant to many seeds too and then try to get rid of them later. I think it's part of the process. So grateful that plants are so willing. Keep up the good work. D.

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  8. Jean, Frugality is important...in the past I would dash out and buy more of what I already had...I think I was afraid to divide...which I ought never to do in the spring when we have such droughty summers. So I am off to pot up the baby hellebores.

    Gail

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